Forever Living Products – Honest Forever Living Products Business Review

Civilizations around the world have used aloe vera for its health benefits

While this is true much remains to be discovered within the Forever Living Products business opportunity. Personally, if you only join a certain business opportunity based on emotion without any research you are setting yourself up for failure.

That is why you don’t need to do this yourself. All will be revealed to you in this short and simple review. Do keep your eyes peeled because its going to be very fast.

1) The Story Of The Aloe Vera Company

The whole story of the “aloe vera company” began with one man named Rex Maughan. It was birthed because Rex had a real urge to bring together a combination of better health and financial freedom. In May 1978, he invited 43 people to attend the first Forever Living Products meeting in Tempe, Arizona.

In 1984, it became the first company to receive the Aloe Science Council Seal of Approval for its products consistency and purity. That is why you see the very term Aloe vera company tagged with Forever Living Products today.

2) Your Product Choices?

Look, I don’t want to sound like a parrot but we should at least know what you’re getting yourself into. Forever Living products mainly consists of cosmetics, food additives and household goods. You choose from Aloe toothpaste to Aloe Vera Gel drinks in different flavors. Think about getting the Aloe craze out to your friends and family and you got it right.

Here’s a fun fact for you. Due to the presence of lignin, aloe is the perfect vehicle to transport other elements with which it is combined. This is why thousands of medical and cosmetic products are mixed with aloe. Aloe Vera has to be processed within hours of harvest to preserve its “freshness”.

3) The Compensation Plan: Dead Giveaway?

Since Forever Living Products mainly rely on direct distribution to expand its reach you will come in as an independent distributor for them. Of course, there is no doubt that you will work with a network marketing system.

Here’s how it works:

a) Forever Living operates on a Stairstep Breakaway plan

b) You can start to earn 30% and move on to 45% in direct commission based on rank

c) When someone under you “breaks away” you earn between 2% to 6%

There are other ways to earn but we will only touch on the core principles here. Recruiting is almost mandatory if you want to make it big with Forever Living Products.

Something Else

If you like Aloe Vera then Forever Living Products might be alright for you. However, keep in mind that your best shot at achieving a good flow of prospects comes from a good marketing system. Invest in one which you can learn and earn at the same time.

The Music Business – Mind Your Manners

In my travels I have been fortunate enough to be-friend some amazing people that were heavily involved in the music industry. One of those became a good friend of mine and she introduced me to some guys who were looking to put a band together.

They asked her if she would join and she said yes, but on one condition, and that condition was that she could bring me along too. I had never played live in a band before, I had never had a guitar or singing lesson, but luckily for me, she obviously had enough confidence in me. Her name is MaryAnne Rex, a very talented guitarist with a wicked sense of humour and is a great friend that would do anything for you. I will never forget what she did for me all those years ago because without her, I may never have achieved the things that I have.

The most important thing I remember she taught me was the discipline needed to work in the music industry.

  • How to dress when you are on stage
  • How to be reliable and not let anyone down
  • How important it was to be there no matter what
  • How to run your band as a business.    

How many times do you hear about successful bands that are now broke?, and usually it is because no-one really bothered to keep an eye on the money side of things.

The most important aspect of the discipline is ‘The Gig’. No matter what, you must be there. Rain, hail or shine, in sickness or in health, you must turn up to play.

You must also be respectful of the times set out by the venue manager when it comes to

  • loading in the sound and lighting gear
  • when they want the sound checks done
  • when your performance times are.

There is nothing worse than ticking off a venue manager which will lead to ticking off your agent, which will then lead to never working in the industry again. It is that simple.

You need to be professional at all times, but remember to have some fun too. I remember some of the most fun I have ever had is when we went on the road to do some mini tours around New South Wales. We did not get much sleep but we had heaps of fun.

Be prepared to make some sacrifices to achieve things in your band. The worst times are when you are dog tired or even sick. It does not matter, you have to be there. That is the type of discipline you will need.

My worst nightmare was having to ask the boss if I could leave early from work. He was the boss from hell and made things really challenging for me. One day, I had had enough and I resigned! There were a few other reasons at the time but I was positive I was making the right decision. A little risky? Yeah sure, but I was not going to fulfill my dream working full time in a post office.

Have you ever heard about the ladder of success? The music business is no different. Start at the bottom, even if it is against your better judgment, and work your way up. You never know who is in the audience at the worst gig in the worst little pub.

Working behind the scenes of a band is exciting too. There are many opportunities and lots of things to learn working as a sound engineer or lighting technician. What about as a tour manager or publicist?

I was lucky enough to get a job in the agency that represented my first band, ‘Backchat’ in Sydney. (The band my friend helped me get into). I had resigned from my government job and started at the agency two days a week rolling posters and doing the banking. Over a period of about 18 months, I was practically running the place. From that job, I joined another band, and in that band, I met my future husband. Just as well I resigned from that government job eh?

Just a little tip for you to remember. If you ever meet anyone that is even slightly famous, and they just happen to compliment you and strike up a conversation with you, don not forget to swap contact details. You never know where that could take you. I have kicked myself in the butt so many times over the years for letting an opportunity like that get away. The guy just happened to be a popular session musician who had many friendships with a lot of famous people. Big mistake!

Anyway, I hope you have a lot of fun, and learn everything you need to achieve your goals.

Col Rex Applegate and the Ultimate Book on Defensive Tactics Kill Or Get Killed

There are a lot of books out there about close combat, a few are even worth reading, but the quintessential close quarters combat and defensive tactics book is Kill or Get Killed. If you want to get an inside look at the skills that will help you survive real combat you need to read Kill or Get Killed. In the pages of this classic work is everything you need to know about close combat and self defense as well as how to handle riots and firefights. First published in 1943 to help Allied soldiers in their fight against the Axis powers, it has been revised several times. Even to this day it still helps police officers and soldiers in countless situations. Its author Colonel Rex Applegate learned close combat from the best, and what he wrote cannot be ignored by anyone serious about being a modern warrior.

Born in Oregon on June 21 1914 Applegate’s family tree includes heroes of the American Revolution and pioneers who settled in the Pacific Northwest. Applegate grew up in Oregon and early on he developed a love for the wilderness. One of his first teachers was his Uncle Gus Peret, an employee of Remington firearms, who taught the young Applegate not to aim at targets, but to point and shoot instinctively and convulsively. By the time Rex Applegate graduated the University of Oregon with a business degree he was already a crack shot. The 6’3″ and powerfully built Applegate excelled at football. But it was here Applegate began his military career when he took part in the Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC). His first assignment would be with the 3rd Infantry Division, an Army Reserve unit that was based out of Fort Lewis Washington.

Prior to the outbreak of World War II Applegate spent his spare time doing research into firefights. His thirst for knowledge about real hand to hand gun fights began extensive research that included police reports and accounts of gunfighters in the old west. The research supported what he already believed; police officers and soldiers weren’t being taught what they needed to know to survive a real life gun fight.

Applegate was openly critical of the training the military provided, but instead of getting the proverbial “shaft” he was given an opportunity. Col. Applegate received a commission in the regular Army. When the United States joined the fight against the Axis powers Applegate was eager to go, but he would instead be recruited into America’s fledgling clandestine intelligence community.

Before WWII there were no elite military units or intelligence gathering agencies. Any units that had existed prior to the war had long since been disbanded. There weren’t even facilities to train new personnel. In the wake of Japan’s 1941 attack the military rushed to adapt to meet the new threat, so the Allies began from scratch, setting secret training camps like Camp Richie in Maryland all over North America and England. Applegate along with others was called in to make the best recruits even better, so the Allies could take the war to the Axis.

Before any recruits could be trained, the instructors had to be trained. They were given a crash course in combat martial arts by British Colonel William E. Fairbairn. At the start of training most of the American instructors thought they had little to learn from the British who had only been losing the war up to that point. Though Fairbairn was a veteran police officer and Royal Marine he looked too many like a kindly gray haired school teacher and was hardly intimidating. Fairbairn put an end to any of the misconceptions the American instructors might have had when Fairbairn took on the much stronger and larger Applegate tossed with him with ease into a crowd during a self defense demonstration. From that point forward everyone was willing to listen to what Fairbairn had to say when it came to hand to hand combat.

Though exact numbers are unknown it is believed that some 10,000 recruits trained at Camp Richie where they learned how to take out enemy sentries, hand-to-hand combat, close combat shooting, and other espionage techniques. It was at Camp Ritchie that Applegate and Fairbairn discovered they shared similar views on shooting. Col Applegate quickly learned the importance of martial arts in close combat situations. A point should be made that both men and women received the same training at Camp Ritchie. Many of those men and women were deployed throughout Europe and the Pacific. Commandos and secret agents would help turn the tide of the war, and would set the ground work for Special Forces units in the future.

After the war Applegate would continue to have adventures and keep learning. He would go south of the border as a representative for several American firearms manufactures, and would advise Mexican soldiers and police officers on how to deal with riots and guerrilla fighters. At first they didn’t think they could learn much from a gringo, but is short time Col Rex Applegate’s skills impressed and training were so effective that to this day, his methods are still taught in Mexico.

When Applegate returned to the United States, he would travel and lecture about tactics and training for both law enforcement and military organizations. He would advise the military in during the Korean and Vietnam wars. He authored a number of books and even helped design a number of combat knives (the most famous is the applegate-fairbairn fighting knife). He would continue to update his master work Kill or Get Killed, incorporating changes in technology, but the fundamentals always remained sound. If you’re serious about learning about close quarter combat tactics then you’d better pickup a copy.