How to Be a Six Figure Earner With Forever Living MLM Business

You may be here because you are looking at joining Forever Living. Or maybe you are here because you already are part of them and you are searching for strategy to build an income with forever home based business. Well, you’re have come to the appropriate page. In other to properly see if forever living is a great mlm company to join, we are going to examine the leadership of the company, the merchandise that they company is marketing and finally the training system which the company integrated for the distributors to reach their goals.

Forever living was started by Rex Maughan in 1974. As the name meant, he was seeking a business idea which will lead to better living and financial freedom. Several years later, this man has grew the company into 9.3 million distributors in over 140 countries world wide. The fact that he started from day 1 and he has the multi-level marketing experience himself is a huge plus. I mean, this company has been around for more than 30 years. We can easily both agree that the leadership of Forever Living is not a problem.

What we have around nowadays are new Multi level marketing companies which were started for just the profitability reasons. I realize we’re in business to make money. When owners without having multi-level marketing experience are confronted with decisions which may favor their distributors or increase their pocket size, most of the time, they’re just centered on their pocket size. That’s why number of these company usually are shut down after a while.

Another crucial aspect of Forever Living you have to consider before you decide to join up with them would be the marketability of their products. Forever Living markets products like Forever Nature’s 18, Aloe Vera Ge, Aloe Berry Nectar, Forever Aloe Bits n’ Peaches, Forever Lite Ultra, Forever Lite Ultra, Forever Lean, Forever Bee Pollen, Forever Aloe2Go, etc. As you probably know already, these are a healthier lifestyle products.

If you’re acquainted with any one of our reviews, you would realize that we aren’t a major fan of MLM companies that market consumable products. We are in a tough economy period. It is very crucial that the products that you market are necessities. Quite simply, if people lose their job, would they still purchase from you? Unfortunately, Forever Living products do not necessarily belong to this “necessity ” category.

How to make money with Forever Living?

To make money with Forever Living business opportunity, there are specific skills that you have to master and be great at. Should you master these skills, you’d probably be at the least a substantial earner in the MLM company.

You have to master the art of marketing. While i say Marketing, We are not referring to marketing Forever Living products. Should you focus your entire energy into selling the Forever living products, you will not make any substantial money inside your MLM business. Your job is not selling. You’re not a sales associate or sales rep. You need to learn to market yourself. Multi level marketing is known as a people’s business.

In other word, you’re the actual product that folks are buying. Your prospect must believe that you are a leader. They have to see you as someone that can lead them to financial freedom land. What all these mean is that you must have value that you are offering. The only technique you could have value to provide anyone is by regularly adding value to yourself. You add value to yourself by reading books, listening to audio tapes, attending seminars. There are many videos on YouTube. Work on yourself.

Another crucial skill that is equally as essential like first one is the ability to generate at least 30 leads per days. As my mentor explained, when you are regularly generating 20 leads each day, you’re a six figure earner. As a MLM professional (Not sales associate), our obligation is to speak to people on the phone and interact with them. That is called prospecting. The greater you are at this, the faster your business will grow.

Generating 30 leads per day has become super easy during this age. You will need a web-based lead generation system. You must leverage the world wide web. You can find billions of people searching the internet everyday looking for what you really are selling,. You are selling a dream. They are your targeted market.

The thing is that we endeavor to build multi billion dollar business with our family and friends. That is simply not feasible. Because they aren’t our targeted market. They love us and we love them. However, that does not always mean that we want or should want them in our business. If you’re lucky, you may sign few people up out of your friends and family. But the reality is usually that the momentum that you receive from that can not last. You should discover ways to constantly generate no less than 30 leads every day on the internet.

Col Rex Applegate and the Ultimate Book on Defensive Tactics Kill Or Get Killed

There are a lot of books out there about close combat, a few are even worth reading, but the quintessential close quarters combat and defensive tactics book is Kill or Get Killed. If you want to get an inside look at the skills that will help you survive real combat you need to read Kill or Get Killed. In the pages of this classic work is everything you need to know about close combat and self defense as well as how to handle riots and firefights. First published in 1943 to help Allied soldiers in their fight against the Axis powers, it has been revised several times. Even to this day it still helps police officers and soldiers in countless situations. Its author Colonel Rex Applegate learned close combat from the best, and what he wrote cannot be ignored by anyone serious about being a modern warrior.

Born in Oregon on June 21 1914 Applegate’s family tree includes heroes of the American Revolution and pioneers who settled in the Pacific Northwest. Applegate grew up in Oregon and early on he developed a love for the wilderness. One of his first teachers was his Uncle Gus Peret, an employee of Remington firearms, who taught the young Applegate not to aim at targets, but to point and shoot instinctively and convulsively. By the time Rex Applegate graduated the University of Oregon with a business degree he was already a crack shot. The 6’3″ and powerfully built Applegate excelled at football. But it was here Applegate began his military career when he took part in the Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC). His first assignment would be with the 3rd Infantry Division, an Army Reserve unit that was based out of Fort Lewis Washington.

Prior to the outbreak of World War II Applegate spent his spare time doing research into firefights. His thirst for knowledge about real hand to hand gun fights began extensive research that included police reports and accounts of gunfighters in the old west. The research supported what he already believed; police officers and soldiers weren’t being taught what they needed to know to survive a real life gun fight.

Applegate was openly critical of the training the military provided, but instead of getting the proverbial “shaft” he was given an opportunity. Col. Applegate received a commission in the regular Army. When the United States joined the fight against the Axis powers Applegate was eager to go, but he would instead be recruited into America’s fledgling clandestine intelligence community.

Before WWII there were no elite military units or intelligence gathering agencies. Any units that had existed prior to the war had long since been disbanded. There weren’t even facilities to train new personnel. In the wake of Japan’s 1941 attack the military rushed to adapt to meet the new threat, so the Allies began from scratch, setting secret training camps like Camp Richie in Maryland all over North America and England. Applegate along with others was called in to make the best recruits even better, so the Allies could take the war to the Axis.

Before any recruits could be trained, the instructors had to be trained. They were given a crash course in combat martial arts by British Colonel William E. Fairbairn. At the start of training most of the American instructors thought they had little to learn from the British who had only been losing the war up to that point. Though Fairbairn was a veteran police officer and Royal Marine he looked too many like a kindly gray haired school teacher and was hardly intimidating. Fairbairn put an end to any of the misconceptions the American instructors might have had when Fairbairn took on the much stronger and larger Applegate tossed with him with ease into a crowd during a self defense demonstration. From that point forward everyone was willing to listen to what Fairbairn had to say when it came to hand to hand combat.

Though exact numbers are unknown it is believed that some 10,000 recruits trained at Camp Richie where they learned how to take out enemy sentries, hand-to-hand combat, close combat shooting, and other espionage techniques. It was at Camp Ritchie that Applegate and Fairbairn discovered they shared similar views on shooting. Col Applegate quickly learned the importance of martial arts in close combat situations. A point should be made that both men and women received the same training at Camp Ritchie. Many of those men and women were deployed throughout Europe and the Pacific. Commandos and secret agents would help turn the tide of the war, and would set the ground work for Special Forces units in the future.

After the war Applegate would continue to have adventures and keep learning. He would go south of the border as a representative for several American firearms manufactures, and would advise Mexican soldiers and police officers on how to deal with riots and guerrilla fighters. At first they didn’t think they could learn much from a gringo, but is short time Col Rex Applegate’s skills impressed and training were so effective that to this day, his methods are still taught in Mexico.

When Applegate returned to the United States, he would travel and lecture about tactics and training for both law enforcement and military organizations. He would advise the military in during the Korean and Vietnam wars. He authored a number of books and even helped design a number of combat knives (the most famous is the applegate-fairbairn fighting knife). He would continue to update his master work Kill or Get Killed, incorporating changes in technology, but the fundamentals always remained sound. If you’re serious about learning about close quarter combat tactics then you’d better pickup a copy.

Between Enthusiasm and Money – Interview With the Author of Sideways – Rex Pickett

In a time when Kirstie Alley is on the cover of People Magazine for gaining eighty seven pounds, Elizabeth Edwards rules the airwaves with a book that promises to dish dirt on her husbands affair and possible love child – do we care about the novelist who puts it all on the line?

We better. It’s our only chance for great stories. Novelists starve, they endure, they barely make it for years. You are always presented with a choice. Keep doing this wrenching wonderful thing or take the easier road like so many before and get a regular job. It is the writers plight to hang by a thread, a nanosecond away from oblivion as you send out your hundredth query, write that final chapter, begin that new story. We hear of the starving artist. For many this is true. The difference is in that moment when you think you can go no further, when truly oblivion seems a better way and nothing good will come of your labor–the difference is the writer who then takes it all and puts it on the line for one last shot and then puts themselves into the writing. That moment when there is nothing left to lose–that is when the possibility of something great quivers on the horizon. Rex Pickett, the author of the novel and movie, Sideways, hit that moment.

“I thought this was it. I’m going to cash it in,” he said on the phone, speaking in a quick staccato voice. “There I was. Rejection letters plastered all over the apartment, divorced, broke, my mother in the hospital, my agent had just died of AIDS, I was in a rent controlled apartment and I still couldn’t pay the rent…a few produced movie shorts, rejected screenplays, novels…but nothing had worked….that’s when I sat down to write Sideways…and it literally saved my life.”

What happened then was a nine week writing marathon that left him exhausted but thrilled.

“I started with this place I went for wine tasting called The Bull Pen…I wanted to write this short story…so while I was writing it this epiphany struck me and I got out of my chair and came up with the idea of Jack and Miles heading up to the wine country for a last hurrah…that was it, I knew I had the book.”

Rex finished the book and after quick rewrites sent it off to an agent at Curtis Brown who loved it, brought over a bottle of wine, and said it read like a film and devised a plan to go after publishing and film simultaneously. The first salvo went down like the Titanic. Fifteen rejections poured in from New York.

“They hated it. Just hated it. Vitriolic. Said it wasn’t literary at all,” Pickett sighed.

So his agent pulled the book and Rex buckled down to rewrite the novel again. Another round of rejections came in and then his agent left the business and he was back to square one.

“Broke…no agent…no prospects…nothing….that’s when I really thought about driving off a cliff. I don’t want to be over dramatic…but I literally didn’t have any money, my mother had a stroke, divorced, and here I was a writer…this is who I am, and I can’t get anywhere.”

Five long dark months later another agent took over the book and went over to creative agency Endeavour. Brian Lipson who wades through material for Alexander Payne read it and after a month of signing with Endeavour, Pickett gets a message on his answering machine from a producer raving about the book, saying Alexander Payne has picked it for his next movie.

“But there’s an old saying in Hollywood, between enthusiasm and money, lies the Grand Canyon,” Rex says laughing. “I mean I met with Alexander and we hugged and all, but then he went and made About Schmidt and my project got shelved.”

Movie deal in hand, Pickett still could not find a publisher for his book. Publishing turned it down again and then the book just dropped from site as a project. The film was on hold for at least two years and Rex Pickett was still without a publisher for his novel. Then agent Dan Strone read an article that said Alexander Payne was making his next movie from an unpublished novel called Sideways.” Strone found it incredible that a successful director like Alexander Payne was making a movie from a book that nobody had picked up the rights too.” He got in contact with Pickett and finally sold the rights to St. Martins for a modest advance.

“I mean here I was….my movie was coming up for production and nobody would publish the book…it was really unbelievable…and yes, I still was waiting for Alexander to begin making the movie.”

Finally production began and Sideways the movie became a reality. The book no one wanted sold a hundred and fifty thousand copies and was translated into eleven languages. The movie Sideways became a hit and launched the careers of Paul Giamatti and Virginia Madsen. Rex Pickett found fame and some fortune.

“You know most writers toil and don’t make a lot of money. So when a film comes up you get caught up in all the hoopla…people calling you, emailing, offering money for this or that…” Rex pauses on the phone. “But really, at the bottom of it all, I am a storyteller. And the main character, Miles, is me. This guy whose novel has been rejected, divorced, looking for salvation in a bottle of wine. He is the guy behind that film. That guy trying to find himself.” Rex pauses again. “I wrote Sideways when the tank was empty and I was on fumes. I say this very seriously, if I could have afforded a gun I would have shot myself…my whole life was in tatters at that moment…but that’s when I sat down and wrote the book that changed everything.”

Rex Pickett still lives in a rent controlled apartment. He is still writing. This is a good thing.