Is The Forever Living Business A Worthwhile Option?

Forever Living is a very successful and popular network marketing company, operating across the globe.

Although they are essentially a ‘health, wellness & beauty’ company and there is a LOT of competition in this niche, don’t let that put you off joining. There will always be competition in any business, some more than others but there will be those who will stand out from the crowd by using the right marketing methods.

Forever Living boast a distributor network that exceeds nine million people! This is very impressive and they serve 145 countries worldwide. The company founder, Rex Maughan had a vision in 1978 of an opportunity for people to experience prosperity and fine health at the same time. His first ever ‘opportunity’ meeting was attended by just forty three people, it was then that he exposed the comp plan and business model he intended to operate. From that time till now, FL has become more successful every month.

There have been many articles about Forever Living in some of the popular magazines such as Inc 500 saying how well the company is doing. There is also a great leadership team behind the company, with a collective wealth of experience that surpasses many company leadership teams.

The Forever Living Products

Aloe Vera is the dominating ingredient in the FL range of products, of which there are a lot to choose from. It’s well documented that Aloe provides several benefits to the human body from its rich nutrients; it’s also effective for soothing skin complaints and burns. The company also has a range of bee products; they actually have their own bee hives to ensure that they can control the source of their ingredients, resulting in a high quality product.

You will be able to get the interest of many different people with the FL product range as there is a wide range to choose from such as weight management, cosmetics, nutritional supplements and skin care. It’s definitely worth taking some time to go through the entire range if you are going to make this your business opportunity, so that you can well inform potential customers and distributors.

Making money with Forever Living

The compensation plan allows you to earn a promotional, front end income from retail sales and a monthly residual (passive) income from building a team of active distributors under you. The FL comp plan is designed to reward those that work the hardest. They also operate a no pass ups system, so that members of your downline can’t be promoted above you without you also being promoted. Assuming that you will do what it takes to be successful, you can make a good living and more with this business opportunity.

There’s a comprehensive training site put together by the company, but ultimately just relying on your ‘warm market’ probably won’t create the kind of results you are looking for… You really need to find a way to bring in new qualified prospects on a regular basis so that you can make a presentation to them. The sad thing about network marketing is that the majority will quit early on into their venture, mainly because they are not making any money and simply don’t have enough people to talk to about the business opportunity they are trying to recruit into.

Col Rex Applegate and the Ultimate Book on Defensive Tactics Kill Or Get Killed

There are a lot of books out there about close combat, a few are even worth reading, but the quintessential close quarters combat and defensive tactics book is Kill or Get Killed. If you want to get an inside look at the skills that will help you survive real combat you need to read Kill or Get Killed. In the pages of this classic work is everything you need to know about close combat and self defense as well as how to handle riots and firefights. First published in 1943 to help Allied soldiers in their fight against the Axis powers, it has been revised several times. Even to this day it still helps police officers and soldiers in countless situations. Its author Colonel Rex Applegate learned close combat from the best, and what he wrote cannot be ignored by anyone serious about being a modern warrior.

Born in Oregon on June 21 1914 Applegate’s family tree includes heroes of the American Revolution and pioneers who settled in the Pacific Northwest. Applegate grew up in Oregon and early on he developed a love for the wilderness. One of his first teachers was his Uncle Gus Peret, an employee of Remington firearms, who taught the young Applegate not to aim at targets, but to point and shoot instinctively and convulsively. By the time Rex Applegate graduated the University of Oregon with a business degree he was already a crack shot. The 6’3″ and powerfully built Applegate excelled at football. But it was here Applegate began his military career when he took part in the Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC). His first assignment would be with the 3rd Infantry Division, an Army Reserve unit that was based out of Fort Lewis Washington.

Prior to the outbreak of World War II Applegate spent his spare time doing research into firefights. His thirst for knowledge about real hand to hand gun fights began extensive research that included police reports and accounts of gunfighters in the old west. The research supported what he already believed; police officers and soldiers weren’t being taught what they needed to know to survive a real life gun fight.

Applegate was openly critical of the training the military provided, but instead of getting the proverbial “shaft” he was given an opportunity. Col. Applegate received a commission in the regular Army. When the United States joined the fight against the Axis powers Applegate was eager to go, but he would instead be recruited into America’s fledgling clandestine intelligence community.

Before WWII there were no elite military units or intelligence gathering agencies. Any units that had existed prior to the war had long since been disbanded. There weren’t even facilities to train new personnel. In the wake of Japan’s 1941 attack the military rushed to adapt to meet the new threat, so the Allies began from scratch, setting secret training camps like Camp Richie in Maryland all over North America and England. Applegate along with others was called in to make the best recruits even better, so the Allies could take the war to the Axis.

Before any recruits could be trained, the instructors had to be trained. They were given a crash course in combat martial arts by British Colonel William E. Fairbairn. At the start of training most of the American instructors thought they had little to learn from the British who had only been losing the war up to that point. Though Fairbairn was a veteran police officer and Royal Marine he looked too many like a kindly gray haired school teacher and was hardly intimidating. Fairbairn put an end to any of the misconceptions the American instructors might have had when Fairbairn took on the much stronger and larger Applegate tossed with him with ease into a crowd during a self defense demonstration. From that point forward everyone was willing to listen to what Fairbairn had to say when it came to hand to hand combat.

Though exact numbers are unknown it is believed that some 10,000 recruits trained at Camp Richie where they learned how to take out enemy sentries, hand-to-hand combat, close combat shooting, and other espionage techniques. It was at Camp Ritchie that Applegate and Fairbairn discovered they shared similar views on shooting. Col Applegate quickly learned the importance of martial arts in close combat situations. A point should be made that both men and women received the same training at Camp Ritchie. Many of those men and women were deployed throughout Europe and the Pacific. Commandos and secret agents would help turn the tide of the war, and would set the ground work for Special Forces units in the future.

After the war Applegate would continue to have adventures and keep learning. He would go south of the border as a representative for several American firearms manufactures, and would advise Mexican soldiers and police officers on how to deal with riots and guerrilla fighters. At first they didn’t think they could learn much from a gringo, but is short time Col Rex Applegate’s skills impressed and training were so effective that to this day, his methods are still taught in Mexico.

When Applegate returned to the United States, he would travel and lecture about tactics and training for both law enforcement and military organizations. He would advise the military in during the Korean and Vietnam wars. He authored a number of books and even helped design a number of combat knives (the most famous is the applegate-fairbairn fighting knife). He would continue to update his master work Kill or Get Killed, incorporating changes in technology, but the fundamentals always remained sound. If you’re serious about learning about close quarter combat tactics then you’d better pickup a copy.

How to Survive in an Alternative World at Roughly the 19th Century of Development – Rex Knight Does

Nitro Wild – by David C. Brown. ISBN 978-0-9831907-9-0. Published by the author, 2017. ($12.99 from Barnes & Noble, paperback edition). Reviewer received book from Author as pdf-book.

David Brown has composed an epic alternative fantasy history tale of the 19th Century.

Rex Knight is the protagonist. From Rex’s mysterious transport from Earth through his first few years on Erden, the inhabitants’ name for their planet, he struggles to survive, thrive, and finally succeed in great ways. Most of the story is related from Rex’s viewpoint.

There are other transported races and groupings of people. The Wapiti spoke a lingua franca that was primarily English, German and some of the indigenous peoples’, the Clovis, own language. This could support other transports and some indigenous groups, but there is also an alien, non-human race called the Ichneumons who rule a substantial part of the continent that appear to be much like 19th century North and South America.

The details of the planet, civilizations and governments here are sprinkled sparingly throughout the story’s development. The Ichneumons are vying for control of the world with the mighty Prussian empire. The area that conforms roughly to the Eastern United States is controlled by the Prussian Empire. The remainder is largely controlled by the Ichnemons. These two empires are at constant conflict for control of this continent. Meanwhile, the European and Asian equivalent continents are split between the Prussians and their allies and the Mongol tribes that are constantly restless if not openly attacking on the eastern borders of Prussia.

Historically, the Ichnemons have conquered and obliterated most of the indigenous population. The Wapiti and the Clovis have avoided such a fate by aligning with the Prussians. That and the rugged wilderness terrain of their area made it much more difficult for the Ichneumons’ Emperor, Rakakonda, and his troops. Since most of the contact had been through attempts at conquest and other forms of war, there is no love lost between the groups. The third major power group here is the slave owners who usually held great cotton plantations and maintained them with slave labor.

The Prussians are entering an Abolitionist time and many established institutions are upset, but specifically the slave trade has been discouraged and then outlawed throughout the empire. This creates another group fighting to control its own destiny. These plantation owners want to maintain the status quo for slavery, fearing that they will be bankrupted with any change.

The plots and the intrigues rival any power in 19th century Earth for sure. This all contributes to the complexity and different perspectives of the narrators. It also makes for a very intense and complex plot.

The format is chapters broken into sections where perspective changes between several narrators.

There are too many characters to describe here, but the most prominent are Rex Knight and his partner, Amy Caroom. Amy is wanted, dead or alive, by her own father, Purnell. From this humble beginning, there are characters numerous and varied. Most do not warrant mention as they pass in and out of the narrative, but they come in, are developed enough to be believable and then move on out of the perspective of the particular narrator.

One of the main difficulties is the incorporation of the alien race as main personnel involved in all the war, the political intrigues and even the antipathy between the slave owners and the Prussian Empire that holds sway over their area.

The plot weaves in and out of focus. The characters move on and off stage. The leaders of the groups and such, keep busy with political and actual problems while interacting well making the plot even stronger.

For lovers of alternative reality and historical adaptations of culture, science and creatures would love this book and it is easy to maintain interest. Since this is the first of a series of books from a relatively prolific author as Brown, all can look forward to more coming from this fertile mind.

5 Stars.

Review by Chris Phillips